Fall Hiking Courses & Webinars

Hike Nova Scotia’s fall schedule of courses and webinars across the province is now available. They focus on skills for novices all the way up to experienced hikers.

“We’re excited to be able to offer our in-person courses again, while respecting public health pandemic restrictions,” says Janet Barlow, Hike NS Executive Director. “But we’re also offering a suite of online webinars so that most people can learn, no matter where they are.”

In-person courses include: 

  • Field Leader – Hiking: Sept. 19-20 or Nov. 14-15
  • Navigation Maps & Compass: Sept. 26-27 or Oct. 24-25
  • Field Leader – Winter: date to be announced

Webinars include:

  • Intro to Hiking: Sept. 23, Oct. 20 or Nov. 18
  • Leave No Trace: Oct. 6
  • Tick Prevention: Sept. 15
  • Wildlife Encounters & Safety: date to be announced

Fast Facts

  • Dates, locations and costs vary, depending upon the course or webinar.
  • Learn more and register at www.hikenovascotia.ca
  • COVID-19 public health guidelines will be followed for in-person courses, which include indoor and outdoor sessions. 
  • Partners include the NS Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage, the Outdoor Council of Canada, Leave No Trace Canada, the District of Chester, AtlanTick Repellent Products and the NS Department of Lands and Forestry Natural Resources Education Centre.
  • Hike Nova Scotia encourages and promotes a growing hiking culture throughout our great province. We strive to be the voice for those who hike, walk and snowshoe. With every step we’re building a community of outdoor adventure enthusiasts.

Social Media

Share on Facebook  
Share on Twitter 
Share on Instagram 

Contact

Hike Nova Scotia
(902) 932-6902
Email 
www.hikenovascotia.ca 

Webinar teaches Leave No Trace Hiking

Being confined to our houses and neighbourhoods for a few months has spurred a renewed love of hiking. When allowed back onto trails in May, people flocked back in what might be record numbers. Few groups were happier than Hike Nova Scotia at the news, but it was also concerning.

Quotes

“Close behind the elation of being allowed back on the trails was a feeling of concern, a fear that we might love our trails to death after such a long absence,” says Janet Barlow, Executive Director of Hike NS. “Personally, I witnessed hoards of hikers at a popular trail in the Valley area on a beautiful weekend in May. There were reports of similar crowds on trails across the province. Thankfully they did a good job of social distancing.”

Event Details

Date: Tuesday, July 7, 2020 at 7 pm
Cost: $20 (free for Hike NS paid members), non-members receive a free one-year individual membership
Registration Deadline: July 6 (webinar spaces are limited)
Registration Link: Learn more and register at www.hikenovascotia.ca

Fast Facts

  • Hike NS felt there was no better time to launch education on Leave No Trace principles, hoping it might counteract the negative environmental impact of so many people enjoying our trails.
  • The webinar is geared for new and experienced hikers. It covers responsible use of our natural areas and techniques to protect our environment and the hiking experience for one another. 
  • It will include an in-depth look at the seven Principles of Leave No Trace and a question and answer session. 
  • The presenter is Jody Conrad, certified Leave No Trace Master Educator. 
  • Offered in partnership with the Municipality of the District of Chester, it is supported by the NS Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage. 
  • Hike NS encourages and promotes a growing hiking culture throughout the province, striving to be the voice for those who hike, walk and snowshoe.

Photos

Find photos on Facebook  or Instagram or use some of the photos on this page.

Social Media

Share on Facebook  
Share on Twitter 
Share on Instagram 

Contact

For more information on these events or Hike Nova Scotia contact:

Janet Barlow, Hike Nova Scotia
(902) 932-6902
Email 
www.hikenovascotia.ca 

Backyard Nature Activities: Unnature Trail

This activity is taught in Hike NS’s Re-Connecting with Nature workshop offered each year in locations throughout the province. This is a one-day, hands-on workshop for adults held mostly outdoors to improve your ability to lead and share an appreciation and understanding of nature with children and youth. We plan to have a schedule available in late June for workshops hopefully scheduled in the fall, if possible.

Unnature Trail

Synopsis: This game challenges participants to look closely at their surroundings, distinguishing human-made objects from a natural setting. This is the formal version but it can be done much more informally.

Set Up and Props: Look for a trail going through an area with trees of various sizes, leaf litter, rotting logs and other plants. Mark the beginning and end of a 20- to 30-meter section of the trail (make sure it is wide enough for two people to pass). Ahead of time, secretly place 16 to 20 human-made objects along one side of the trail. Some of these should stand out (e.g., brightly colored balloons or fluorescent pink cockroaches). Others should blend with surroundings (e.g., rubber bands or clothespins). Keep the number of objects you have planted a secret.

Source: Adapted from Sharing Nature®: Nature Awareness Activities for All Ages by Joseph Cornell.

Activity

1. Trail Walk: Have the kids walk the trail one at a time, trying to spot as many objects as they can. They are to remain quiet and not pick up the objects or point them out to others. Have them whisper in your ear how many objects they saw. 

2. Repeat Trail Walk: Tell each child the total number of objects, and have each walk the trail again, trying to find more. Total “looking” time can range from 5 to 10 minutes, depending on the age and attention span. 

3. Group Object Collection: After two rounds, go to one end of the trail and have the participants tell you where the objects are, picking them all up as you go. Discuss how camouflage and coloration helps animals hide in the woods. They can then go on a search for small camouflaged animals (insects, spiders, etc.) if they choose. 

Early Childhood Adaptation: “What would the gnomes do with garbage in the forest? They need help to collect it and put it where it belongs, in the recycling or the garbage!” Take along a clear bag and a blue bag. Make sure the children are not picking up anything that could cut them. Pre-plant small, med and large items to be found on the trail ahead of time. Plant 10 objects and get the children to make fist out of their hands. They raise a finger out of their fist for each object they find until they have all fingers extended.

Backyard Nature Activities: Leaf Slides

This activity is taught in Hike NS’s Re-Connecting with Nature workshop offered each year in locations throughout the province. This is a one-day, hands-on workshop for adults held mostly outdoors to improve your ability to lead and share an appreciation and understanding of nature with children and youth. We plan to have a schedule available in late June for workshops hopefully scheduled in the fall, if possible.

Leaf Slides

Synopsis: Everyone is invited to a slide show and selects a special leaf as a ticket for admission. At the natural theatre, the leader gives each person a slide frame. Each person puts the leaf into the frame. Everyone holds their leaf slide up to the light in a circle and then passes their slides around when the leader clicks.

Set-up and Props: You need one leaf slide per person. Take an approximately 40 by 20 cm light piece of cardboard and fold it in half to get a 20 by 20 cm slide (you could cut up an old filing folder). Label “Leaf Slide” across the top with the fold at the bottom. Then cut a 5 cm square viewing window through both layers of cardboard and the leaf is placed inside the cardboard like a sandwich, over the hole. Pick a nice clear spot to circle up for the slide show. Find a narrow spot between the trees to form the entryway into the theatre so they can go in single file with you “at the door”.

Source: Adapted from Earthwalks by Kirk Hoessle & Steve Van Matre, Institute for Earth Education, 1980.

Activity

1. Lead in: “Often when you go to parks and special places, they give you a slide show to start off. Well, I have one for you and we are going to be able to run the projector right out here in the middle of the woods. Instead of taking place in a dark room, we need a bright open area – like that one over there!” (S)he gestures toward a nearby clearing in the woods.

2. Introduce Leaf Ticket: “But don’t expect to get in without your ticket for admission. Get yourself a very special leaf you can find and meet me over there. Don’t pick up just any leaf and make sure everyone has a different one. I’ll check your tickets there.”

3. Inspect leaves at door: Move ahead to the clearing while they select leaves. As they arrive, put them in single file outside the theatre and give each leaf a quick inspection. Instruct them to keep their tickets as they enter the theatre and form a good circle. 

4. Demonstrate how to make a slide, then hand out frames: Join the circle and note that “you not only hold the tickets in your hands, you also hold the slides for the slide show. I’ve got something here that will help you make your slide.” Show the group a leaf slide frame and demonstrate its use. “This will complete your leaf slide. Simply place your leaf inside. You’ll then be able to experience the incredible beauty in leaves.” 

5. Demonstrate how to focus slide: Let them look at slides initially and then  “Now I’ll show you a different way to focus and view your leaf slide. Hold your slide up to the sky at arm’s length, close one eye, and bring the leaf right up to your eye. Then slowly move the slide back towards the sky until the leaf comes into focus. See what happens? You can see all the veins.”

6. Conduct Show: “Now it’s time for the slide show. That’s when we take a look at each other’s leaf slides. Let’s imagine that we form a circle of slides in a tray, just like the tray on top of an old-fashioned slide projector. When you hear the slide projector click, pass your slides around to the left. Use that same focusing technique to view each slide.” The leader clicks until the slides have gone all around and everyone has their own back.

Early Childhood Adaptation: Use a clothes pin to hold the leaf, rather than the paper frame.

Backyard Nature Activities: Nature’s Symphony

This activity is taught in Hike NS’s Re-Connecting with Nature workshop offered each year in locations throughout the province. This is a one-day, hands-on workshop for adults held mostly outdoors to improve your ability to lead and share an appreciation and understanding of nature with children and youth. We plan to have a schedule available in late June for workshops hopefully scheduled in the fall, if possible.

Nature’s Symphony

Synopsis: Everyone sneaks into the back row of a natural concert hall and listens in silence for several minutes to the symphony of sounds.

Set-up (there are no props!): The only trick is to find the right place to do it. It is nicest to pick the side of a hill so that it feels a bit like the upper rows of a concert hall with the stage down below. When you are scouting, listen for the types of sounds – you want to pick a spot that minimizes human sounds and maximizes nature sounds. It is great to be near water.

Activity

1. Lead in: Just a touch before the previous activity is winding down, interrupt and wonder about the time, and ask someone who has a watch for it. Be shocked how late it is, point out that you had arranged a concert for ten minutes from now at this incredible concert hall. Explain that the concert will give you the opportunity to meet a number of the inhabitants around here that you do not usually get to see, but everyone has to work on their listening skills to take advantage of this chance. Quickly explain that the group will obviously be late, but that if they are quick and quiet, you think they can still sneak in the back rows. 

2. Move to Concert Hall: Adopt a hushed urgent tone (this is critical to the magic) and lead the way single file to your pre-selected concert hall. You want the distance from the end of the last activity into the concert hall to be short but significant, maybe 10-15 metres, but it depends on the lay of the land. You want it long enough to give people the chance to make a transition to the new activity in hushed tones, but you don’t want to give them time to think or talk.

3. Seat Group in Hall: Stand at the entrance to the hall and point/usher the participants to the seats. Make sure they are all huddled together in a group, just about touching each other, all facing the stage. After they are seated, sit yourself on the end of the first row.

4. Focus Group on Listening: Point out that you all seem to be just in time, thank them for being quick and quiet. Ask them to hit their ears to get the “cobwebs” out. Point out that this is very subtle but beautiful music and they will have to listen intently. They could picture their ears growing like elephant ears. Ask them to try to avoid naming the sounds, but rather ask them to listen to the pure sound and represent it as a tone in their minds if they need to.

5. Dim Lights, Start Concert: Point out that when the concert starts, the lights will be dimmed – they need to shut their eyes. Point out the concert will be several minutes long. Then start the silence (if you can talk and also listen to the woods at the same time, it is neat if you can listen for a proper time to start (maybe the wind is picking up).

6. Create Ending: Listen for around 4 to 5 minutes though the length depends on the group. It is helpful to quit a bit after you get your first inclination to quit but it is up to you. End the silence by commenting on how beautiful the concert was and start a round of applause.

7. Sharing of What Was Heard: Ask people what sounds they heard and what was neat. Share some of what you heard. Discuss.

Backyard Nature Activities: Scratch and Sniff

This activity is taught in Hike NS’s Re-Connecting with Nature workshop offered each year in locations throughout the province. This is a one-day, hands-on workshop for adults held mostly outdoors to improve your ability to lead and share an appreciation and understanding of nature with children and youth. We plan to have a schedule available in late June for workshops hopefully scheduled in the fall, if possible.

Scratch and Sniff 

Synopsis: Introduce the sense of smell with an aromatic natural item. Then demonstrate the process of scratching an item to release the scent while you put special potion on the object with a scent catcher sponge. The potion helps to catch the scent molecules in your nose. Participants then scratch and sniff across an area. At the end they pair up and share their favorite sniffs. 

Props and Set-up: You need a potion bottle (neat reused bottle) with potion in it (water), a bowl to pour the potion into, plus a scent catcher (small piece of sponge) for each person. It is nice to have it in an open enough area for freedom of movement. Scout the area out so you know some of the neat smells that are there to share ahead of time. 

Source: Adapted from Earthwalks by Kirk Hoessle & Steve Van Matre, Institute for Earth Education, 1980. 

Activity 

1. Introduce Challenge of Smell Sense: Note that you have the hardest sense challenge of them all… but you think they can handle it. It’s a skill that most humans do not use much anymore – the sense of smell. There are incredible smells out here, and some are easy… try this (let them smell a sprig of spruce or balsam fir). But most smells are tough to find, so I will share a couple of my tricks of the trade. 

2. Introduce the Scratch: “Most natural scents are hidden just below the surface of whatever it is that has them – they’re just waiting to burst forth and be released to the world outside. We’re going to try to find some of these scents, and I know a special way to help us find them. It’s called scratch and sniff. Simply scratch the surface of a natural object with your fingernail, and let the scent burst out! Then you must sniff before the scent goes away.”

3. Introduce the Potion: “Now, some of these scents, even though they burst out, are difficult to capture long enough for us to sniff. And some of them are just too faint to detect. To help overcome these problems, we’ll use the aid of this special potion and a ‘scent catcher’. This bottle contains a very old and special potion that comes from a hidden stream. This stream flows from a spring deep in the earth, and it is the special waters of this stream that are perfectly suited for capturing scents”. Adjust the story and fill in details as you see fit. 

4. Demonstrate Use of Scent Catchers: Pour some potion out of the bottle into the bowl…”These scent catchers can soak up the special solution and all you need to do is drip a bit on the object each time you go to scratch and sniff something. It will hold the scent long enough for you to get a whiff of it.” Demonstrate by scratching and sniffing several things and share the sniff. 

5. Prove Potion’s Effectiveness: “I can see you don’t believe this really works. I can prove it. Here, smell this sprig of fir [quickly put it under someone’s nose]. It has some smell, right? Now I will scratch it [crinkle it up] and drop some potion on it. Now smell it. It is much stronger right? [Let others try it.] You see it really works!”

6. Define Area for Scratch and Sniff: “Now see what you can discover, scratch and sniff your way over to there, where you’ll meet me. You can scratch and sniff anything – plants, roots, soil, and even rocks. Along the way, remember your favorite scratch and sniff. Lots of great scratch and sniffs are along the ground too, so don’t be afraid to get down to look for them. If you find a good sniff, share it with someone else. Oh, one more thing before you get started. This is ‘scratch and sniff’ not ‘squash and sniff’. Be gentle with what you’re sniffing!” 

7. Encourage and Model Scratching and Sniffing: Scratch and sniff yourself and point out things to the group members that give good sniffs. Encourage them to get down on their knees as there are a lot of neat sniffs near the ground. 

8. Pair Up for Sharing Sniffs: When they all arrive at the defined ending spot, have them pair up with whomever has the same color scent catcher. They then retrace their routes with their new partners and share their favorite scratch and sniff. 

Hike NS Introduces Hiking Virtually

How do you introduce people to hiking in the middle of a pandemic? In an age where in-person workshops aren’t allowed and group hikes a no-go, Hike Nova Scotia came up with a solution: go virtual with an Intro to Hiking webinar.

Quotes

“Now that Nova Scotians are allowed back into parks and on the trails we figured there would be interest since people were so thirsty to get back outside,” says Janet Barlow, Executive Director of Hike NS and the webinar presenter. “The webinar is our way of engaging people who want to start hiking or hike more but want some basic knowledge to stay safe and have a good experience.”

Event Details

Date: Thursday, May 28, 2020 at 7 pm
Cost: $20 (free for Hike NS paid members), non-members receive a free one-year individual membership
Registration Deadline: May 27 (webinar spaces are limited)
Registration Link: Learn more and register at www.hikenovascotia.ca

Fast Facts

  • This “taster” session covers how to prepare for a hike and hiking best practices.
  • It includes information you need before you leave, what to bring and wear, self-care and hiking etiquette.
  • The one-and-a-half hour webinar also includes a half-hour question and answer session. 
  • Hike NS thanks the NS Department of Communities, Culture and Heritage for its support. 
  • Hike NS encourages and promotes a growing hiking culture throughout the province, striving to be the voice for those who hike, walk and snowshoe.

Photos

Find photos on Facebook  or Instagram or use some of the photos on this page.

Social Media

Share on Facebook  
Share on Twitter 
Share on Instagram 

Contact

For more information on these events or Hike Nova Scotia contact:

Janet Barlow, Hike Nova Scotia
(902) 932-6902
Email 
www.hikenovascotia.ca 

Backyard Nature Activities: Faces in the Forest

This activity is taught in Hike NS’s Re-Connecting with Nature workshop offered each year in locations throughout the province. This is a one-day, hands-on workshop for adults held mostly outdoors to improve your ability to lead and share an appreciation and understanding of nature with children and youth. We plan to have a schedule available in late June for workshops hopefully scheduled in the fall, if possible.

Faces in the Forest 

Synopsis: Each participant receives a picture frame and uses it to find natural faces in tree trunks, rocks, on the ground, etc. 

Set Up & Props: A picture frame (approximately 24 by 30 cm) for each person made of wood or cardboard. The site can be flexible. Find a demo face ahead of time when you scout the area. 

Activity 

1. Intro: “Have you ever noticed that there are a lot of faces out here in the forest? So many of the creatures, and trees and things around us actually have faces that you may not have known about! And…they portray many different feelings as well!” 

2. Practice Feeling Faces: “We can tell people’s different emotions by their facial expressions. Here…let’s practice! Everyone close your eyes, and on the count of three, when we open our eyes, let’s have everyone make a different expression. (Count and then open). Wow! Oh, look at everyone! I see… (name expressions such as happy, sad, angry, surprised, etc).” 

3. Show Some Forest Examples: “Well, the extra challenge for you right now, is to find the faces in the forest AND to try to find different emotions.” (Demonstrate… find and describe a couple of faces in trees or rocks) “Oh look, I see one. What kind of face is the one I found here? How about this one?” 

4. Demonstrate Finding Faces Technique: Since it is hard to see these Faces in the Forest, I have a Character Finder to help. Here’s how to use it: 

1) Hold it at arms-length from you.
2) Look at the object through the frame. 
3) Search for the faces. 

5. Create Partners and Explain Search Task: As you go, remember where you found each face because at the end we are going to ask you to show the coolest face to everyone. Stick together and share your faces with each other. 

6. Participants Search for Faces: Encourage them and remind them to see if they can find different types. 

7. Remind Them to Pick & Prepare to Share Coolest Face 

8. Do Tour of Each Pair’s Coolest Face

Backyard Nature Activities: Meet a Tree

This activity is taught in Hike NS’s Re-Connecting with Nature workshop offered each year in locations throughout the province. This is a one-day, hands-on workshop for adults held mostly outdoors to improve your ability to lead and share an appreciation and understanding of nature with children and youth. We plan to have a schedule available in May for workshops hopefully scheduled in late June and in the fall, if possible.

Meet a Tree (Tree Friends) 

Synopsis: Participants are split into pairs, a leader and a visitor, and the visitor is then led to and introduced to a tree friend while his/her vision is “blocked.” The visitor gets to know the tree through the sense of touch, and then is led back to the starting point. The visitor takes the blindfold off and then must return to find the tree by sight. The pair then switches roles. 

For older youth and adults, this activity may be pitched as an open ended “tour of touch”. Instead of the leader taking the visitor to a specific tree, the leader gives the visitor a tour of the area and lets them explore various objects and touches while blindfolded. 

Set-up and Props: There needs to be one vision mask for each pair of participants (bandana or scarf to cover the eyes). Pick an area with a lot of trees to give choice, but make sure it is an area with relatively good footing and an absence of thick bushes and undergrowth. The risk management issue for this activity is that the leading child will be silly or cavalier with the visiting child, and that the visitor will fall and get hurt. This is a major concern and must be dealt with through (1) choice of a good site, and (2) careful instructions to the participants. 

Activity 

1. Lead In: Point out that you have a great chance for them to practice meeting the kinds of friends that are most frequent out here in the forest. Move the kids to the area where they will meet the new friends. 

2. How to Visit Tree Friends: Explain that these friends are different – tree friends to be exact. But emphasize that you don’t meet or get to know tree friends in the same way you get to know people friends. In fact you have to meet them in a different way because they are shy, they do not like their friends looking at them at the very start. So, here’s what you have to do: 

-Have kids form pairs – you pick pairings to get good combinations.
-One person is the leader, and one person is the visitor.
-The leader decides on a tree friend s/he wants to introduce the visitor to. The leader takes the visitor over to the tree friend and allows the visitor to get to know the tree. 
-But there is a catch, trees are shy and you can’t look at them when you are getting to know them. So, that means the visitor must wear this vision mask during the whole time he or she is getting to know the tree friend. 

3. Review Process: So we will start here (demonstrate with a volunteer), the visitor puts on the vision mask and the leader takes the visitor to a new tree friend. The visitor gets to know the tree, then the leader leads the visitor back here, and the visitor takes off the vision mask. Then the challenge is for the visitor, using your eyes, to go back and find your new friend. After you have done this, you will switch roles and the leader will become the visitor and the visitor will become the leader. Also, to make it tougher, the leader can spin the visitor around at the start and the end so that it is harder for them to know where they are headed to meet their tree friend. 

4. Important Expectations: Two things are very important about getting to know a tree [Cover these next two points in a serious tone]: 

-When you meet your tree friend, you have to get to know your friend very well – without using your eyes. You want to feel its shape, the touch of the bark, how many branches there are. You might want to rub it with your cheek, give it a hug to know how big it is (include your own ideas). Get to know it really well. [While you are saying these things, demonstrate with a nearby tree] 
-Second, the leaders have to be very careful when they are leading the visitor. You have to hold the person carefully and lead them like this [demonstrate with one of the children—hold the visitor at the shoulders or side, do not pull the visitor using their arms]. Lead the visitor slowly and carefully and tell the visitor if the footing is bad. If I see that any leader is not being careful, the leader will lose the chance to continue and will have to sit over here. Everyone will get the chance to be the visitor so you all will realize how important it is for the leader to be careful. 

5. Do Activity: Start the activity and supervise to make sure everyone is being careful. If a given pair is too slow or fast, talk with them to help everyone finish at near the same time. 

6. Final Sharing About Friend: When everyone is done, have everyone sit in a circle. Go around and have each person share one thing they really liked about their new friend. Each person has to come up with something different. 

Early Childhood Adaptation: We do not recommend using vision blockers with this age group. It works without the vision-blockers just fine. 

Backyard Nature Activities: Human Camera

This activity is taught in Hike NS’s Re-Connecting with Nature workshop offered each year in locations throughout the province. This is a one-day, hands-on workshop for adults held mostly outdoors to improve your ability to lead and share an appreciation and understanding of nature with children and youth. We plan to have a schedule available in May for workshops hopefully scheduled in late June and in the fall, if possible.

Human Camera

Synopsis: Participants work in pairs with one being the photographer and one the camera. The photographer positions the camera to take neat photos of natural objects by rapidly opening and closing their eyes.

Set Up and Props: None. Pick a locale with good footing as one person keeps their eyes closed while moving.

Activity

1. Introduce Human Camera: Ask if anyone has brought his or her camera. Explain that you bought yours. In fact yours is not one of those expensive varieties.

2. Explain Camera Features: Ask one participant to stand up next to you and close his/her eyes. Introduce a person as a camera by noting film is inside the top (head) and it has two lenses (eyes). Shutters (eyelids) cover lenses and must stay closed until the camera is positioned just so for the picture. The picture button is either engaged by tugging on the ear or by having the camera make a fist and then picking up the thumb (you choose). The camera is versatile as it is a bipod and can be positioned. One must be careful when moving the camera about and positioning it as it is fragile.

3. Demonstrate Use of Camera: Carefully move the camera (person) with their shutters closed into a neat position so as to capture a picture. Demonstrate a close up where you manipulate the camera into a position and then tilt the head properly. Push the button and take the picture. Point out some of the other possibilities – sky shots up into the trees, close-ups on trees, close-ups where the camera is on its knees, etc. Emphasize the need to handle the camera with care. Emphasize safety when one person is leading the other in a pair with their eyes closed.

4. Split into Camera/Photographer Pairs: Split the crew into pairs with one being the camera. Ask them to take 6 pictures and then trade roles. Ask them to remember their neatest photo and encourage the photographers to be creative.

5. Encourage Photo Sharing: As pairs finish, encourage sharing of some of individuals neat photos, do this as a group when everyone is done if there is time.